The Transition from Pre-school to Primary School

By Deborah Khan

Good early childhood care and education has strong, long lasting, positive effects on children’s development (Hendrick & Weismann, 2010).  Early learning experiences have a decisive impact on how children function as adults and subsequently on how they affect society. Positive experiences and warm responsive care can enhance brain development. Negative experiences can do the opposite. During these formative years, there are prime times for acquiring different kinds of knowledge and skills.

Early childhood care and education is defined as group settings deliberately intended to affect children from birth to eight years of age (Gordon & Browne, 2011). In the context of this paper, the settings referred to begin with preschool, which caters for children three to five years of age and continues to the primary school through the kindergarten or the infant department. The transition between these two institutions is very significant.

"Issues and Perspectives in Early Childhood Development and Education in Caribbean Countries," edited by Dr. Carol Logie and Professor Jaipaul Roopnarine

Book issues

Issues and Perspectives in Early Childhood Development and Education in Caribbean Countries was published by Caribbean Educational Publishers (2003) Ltd. This publication was edited by Caribbean experts in the field of Early Childhood Development, Dr. Carol Logie, Administrative Director of The University of the West Indies Family Development and Children’s Research Centre and Lecturer at the School of Education, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago together with Professor Jaipaul L. Roopnarine, Adjunct Professor of Teaching and Leadership in the School of Education at Syracuse University; and a Research Scientist at the Family Development and Children’s Research Centre at The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago.

New publication for practitioners in the fields of child and family development: “Childrearing Practices in the Caribbean: Lessons and Implications from a National Study in Trinidad and Tobago,” edited by Dr. Carol Logie and Dr. Jaipaul L. Roopnarine

 

childbearing practices book cover

The volume, Childrearing Practices in the Caribbean: Lessons and Implications from a National Study in Trinidad and Tobago, edited by Dr. Carol Logie (UWI) and Dr. Jaipaul L. Roopnarine (Syracuse University), was recently launched at The UWI-Family Development Centre (FDC) in St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago. The publication analysed findings from The UWI-Family Development Centre (FDC) landmark national study in Trinidad and Tobago (1504 families from diverse ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds) that focused on the most important assets in any society—children and families. Nobel Laurates, policy experts, economists, and social scientists have pointed to the importance of investing in families and children and the potential economic and social returns (e.g., stable communities) to society from such investment.

Advocacy Works! Spotlight

The University of the West Indies-Family Development Centre

History

On Friday 16th September 1988 the University of the West Indies’ Faculty of Education opened its Laboratory Pre-school – the first University Laboratory Pre-school in the region. From 1988 to 2000, the Centre grew as global theories and international standards evolved. An eclectic curriculum, drawing principles from Reggio Emilia schools, HighScope and Montessori programmes and Howard Gardner’s philosophy of Multiple Intelligences: How Children Learn, distinguished this pioneering centre.

Caribbean Empowerment and Advocacy through a Professional Network

By Dr. Carol Logie

The Caribbean Research Empowerment Network (CREN) Team would like to welcome you to our brand-new website. Together we will create an environment which emphasizes advocacy and development and allows open discussion among professionals, stakeholders and advocates. CREN is an initiative of The University of the West Indies-Family Development Centre (UWI-FDC) and is the first virtual community to focus on the daily professional life of educators and administrators in the fields of child development and education in the Caribbean. The CREN focuses on knowledge-generation, solution building and advocacy within the Caribbean context by mobilizing educators, parents and other professionals. The CREN is the first to provide a platform for early childhood educators and practitioners to articulate child and family issues central to the Caribbean. It is, therefore, the first professional regional website for Caribbean Early Childhood Professionals (CECP), an acronym which CREN is now introducing into its regional discourse.